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Essay On Migration And Globalization

The Effect Of Globalization On The International Labor Migration

Since 1815, globalization has generated profound influences on international labor migration. The integration of commodity has accelerated the trading process between the nations and diminished the border effect between countries. In developed countries, because of the increasing number of the aging population, the society are in need of many young workers to facilitate with the industrial growth so that the authority has to open the gate for international labors; for developing countries, high unemployment rate and the dissatisfaction of current living standard has pushed some people to pursue better life in other territories. Globalization has provided an opportunity to fulfill the demands of both agents. Meanwhile, there are some unexpected downsides of this phenomenon. In this article, I would like to discuss the early stage of migration, the positive and negative effects of the international labor migration that was led by globalization, and the relationships between globalization and migration.

The history of migration can be traced back to slave trade period, which was a form of "involuntary" migration. Another form of migration was called "voluntary" migration, which has become a trend after 1850 when many "guest workers" go to other countries and work temporarily there. Nowadays, there is a trend showing that more and more skilled workers are flooding into, most of all, developed countries. "The greatest era for recorded voluntary mass migration was the century after 1815" (Hirst, Thompson & Bromley). In Britain, the end of Napoleonic war has released a lot of free labors, such as soldiers, to the market and thus there was a big surplus of labors in the market. Meanwhile, the industrial revolution has hit the traditional handcraft industry even though it has helped the nation defeat the war and flourished the economy. According to Canadian Heritage Gallery, "The industrialism of steam and iron machinery had helped defeat Napoleon; but it had also struck hard at traditional cottage handcrafts in Britain, disrupted whole districts and communities, and produced ill-built, crowded factory towns that were hives of misery and disease" (1999). In addition, as the cost of shipping dwindling down, people who were eager to leave the country are now having the opportunity. Post-war depression has traumatized the economy and the excess of labors has led to the imbalance situation between the market and the labor capacity. Thus, the competition in job market was getting intense while the wage level was dropping down. The unsatisfying living condition has pushed more and more people joined the immigration forces. They believed that the new continental can offer them cheap land and therefore they have a better chance to fight for the life they expected. Furthermore, former immigrants have encouraged their left-behind relatives to follow their routes and explore the new world. Last but not least, the government has...

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Globalization and Immigration

2438 WordsMay 8th, 201010 Pages

Introduction
Nowadays migration is getting to be one of the dominant characteristics of the modern world since at the present moment that movement of people and migration of citizens from one country to another become a norm. Not surprisingly that such unparallel and extremely high level of migration results in substantial demographic, ethnical and socio-cultural changes in many countries of the world.
In this respect, it is worthy of mention that such a situation with the migration is the result of the recent trend in the world economy which is characterized by processes which are generally called globalization. The process of globalization is overwhelming and involves practically all countries of the world with rare exceptions which…show more content…

Naturally, it resulted in an extreme specialization of countries that makes their economies one-sided, and consequently more exposed to economic and social crisis.
However, globalization developed international contacts and made it possible to cooperate on the global scale. As a result, nowadays, basically due to the high level of development of IT and Internet, specialists physically living in different countries of the world may work on one and the same product. So, it may be said that globalization “eliminated geographical boundaries between countries” (Gomory 2002:187).
As for its effects, they are quite contradictive. The contrast is particularly obvious between well-developed countries and developing ones. In short, its effect may be expressed in one phrase, richer countries become richer, and poor countries become poorer. Though it sounds a bit radical and more precisely, it should be said that globalization makes developing countries more dependant on well-developed and it also makes practically all the countries of the world more submitted to global crisis since their economies are closely interlinked than a crisis in one country would lead to the same effect on economies of other countries that are its economic partners. In this respect, migration seems to be probably the most effective by such a striking contrast that leads to high level of emigration from developing countries and respectively high level of

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